Two Visions of America: Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson

This will be a four-session application based colloquium style discussion that will rely heavily on participant preparation and involvement. Registrations must be approved by Institute staff.

Description

This conference will examine the visions of two significant figures in the Founding period: Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton. Though they held similar views in their justification for independence from Great Britain and the founding of America, they had contrasting ideas regarding the interpretation of the Constitution, the extent of executive power, national finance, and diplomacy.

Participants will explore the debate through a review of government reports, public editorials, and in their correspondence with various officials regarding the following subjects: the movement for independence, the design and ratification of the constitution, and the constitutionality of the national bank, diplomacy, and commerce.

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